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Skull Tankard or Flask

Skull Tankard or Flask

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Gilded Pewter Skull Tankard or Flask

•  Skull Design
•  Powerful and Deadly
•  1 Pint Volume
•  Perfect for any Pirate Fanatic
•  FREE SHIPPING ON THIS ITEM!!!!
To Order
Model No. Availability Price Description Qty
SBAG-TANK-SKULL This item is no longer available. $104 Skull Pewter Tankard
SBAG-FLASK-SKULL Stock* $104 Skull Pewter Flask

* Stock items ship from Strongblade in 1-3 days. Please allow an additonal day for engraving or sharpening.
Romanticized and vilified in literature and film, pirates have been the subject of endless fascination. Pirates of course, are any group of sailors who drink from tankards and flasks (ones with skulls), prey upon other ships, stealing money or goods and sometimes harming or killing the crew. Eye patches seem to have something to do with piracy as well, but no one can really figure out what.

The tankard and flask are made from fine pewter which any pirate would want for his own. The tankard holds 1 pint and the flask 6 ounces but of as you know will be refilled frequently. See more specifications in the tab below.
Tankard Specifications:
Height: 5 Inches
Base Width: 4 Inches
Rim Diameter: 3.25 Inches
Weight: 10 ounces
Gauge Of Pewter: .26 Inches
Tankard Volume: 1 Pint

Flask Specifications:
Flask Volume: 6 ounces
Romanticized and vilified in literature and film, pirates have been the subject of endless fascination. Pirates of course, are any group of sailors who prey upon other ships, stealing money or goods and sometimes harming or killing the crew. Eye patches seem to have something to do with piracy as well, but no one can really figure out what.

It's hard to say when pirating first started. There are reports of pirates as far back as ancient Greece, and possibly even before, but the pirates that most people think of are the ones from the 17th through the 19th centuries. This was a time when governments actually sanctioned piracy against their enemies (apparently, it was okay to steal from and murder people as long as they were considered enemies of your country). Under these government laws, anyone could attack ships belonging to an enemy country and keep anything that they could recover from the ships. Crews that took advantage of these laws were called "Privateers," which was French for "mean guys with parrots," or "men who drink rum." Well, okay. Privateer isn't really French at all. But "soufflé" is, and it means a "light fluffy dish of egg yolks and stiffly beaten egg whites mixed with cheese or fish or fruit."

Many countries encouraged privateers, including England, Spain, America, France, and many North African countries (these African countries formed the heart of the infamous Barbary Coast pirates). And while the idea of privateers might have sounded good when it was first thought up, it lost some of its charm later on. Here’s why: The privateers theorized that, "Hey, if I can get 100 gold a month attacking enemy ships, I could probably get 400 a month attacking any ship." They began testing that hypothesis and, soon, there were hundreds (thousands even) of former privateers attacking any ship that came near them. Thus began the Golden Age of Piracy.

Pirates may have been a lot of things, but they were rarely inefficient. Ship-based life called for cleanliness, order and efficiency in all things. Which is why the cutlass was a favorite of the yo-ho-ho crowd. The weapon was both sword and shield: a vicious blade at one end, a dazzling basket hilt on the other. The blade was short enough to be swung recklessly (without fear of getting caught in rigging or masts) and wide enough to do real damage when it hit. The baskethilt provided excellent hand protection and could even be used as a small shield. The curved blade allowed for fast, efficient cutting and looked pretty good, too.

Click on the link to read the rest of the article about pirates and pirate swords

Strongblade Cutlets - 100% Cuts of Usefule Information
The Japanese katana was often worn paired with another smaller sword or dagger. The shorter sword, called a wazashi (also known alternately as Wakizashi and, occasionally, Fred) measured twelve to twenty-four inches in length. The dagger, a tanto measured six to twelve inches in length. Tonto, from the Lone Ranger, has nothing to do with Asian weapons, but for the record, he was 67 inches long. Strongblade sells lots of katanas. Have a look at our samurai swords.
Keywords: Skull, Pirate, Tankard, mug, pewter, drink, handle, cup